GE’s

Most schools like their students to be generally educated, hence the General Education requirements, or GE’s. Regardless of what degree you are pursuing, you must fulfill GE’s. Only some certificates do not require them.

If you intend to transfer, different schools have slightly different GE’s. For example, California state colleges (CSU’s) like Chico State or Cal Poly require a class in speech but Universities of California (UC’s) like Berkeley and Davis do not. This means that your GE’s depend on your goal.

Though they differ, most GE’s share some commonalities:

Math – To meet your math requirement you need to take at least one college level math class, normally Statistics or Calculus (do stats!).

English – For this requirement, you must complete a college level English class. Because classification systems for English classes vary by college I can’t tell you much more about this. Ask your counselor, or an English teacher.

Begin working on your math and English GE’s immediately. These classes are the ones that most commonly hold students up and delay graduation. Starting your first semester/quarter, take a math and an English class.

Breadth – In addition to math and English you will need to take a number of classes in science, history, and other categories to fulfill your GE’s. Generally there are several classes you can choose from to meet these requirements, so use them to explore. Take classes that look interesting to you!

For college specific information on GE’s, follow this very long link: http://ccctransfer.org/ccc/ccc-general-education-sheets-for-csu-and-uc

I will post an article soon on the specifics of meeting GE’s for CSU’s and UC’s.

This article was created for you by Kate.

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Posted in All, Classes, Transfering, Year 1
One comment on “GE’s
  1. […] Completion of IGETC isn’t a requirement for transferring, but it is the most common way to meet GE requirements for students transferring from […]

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